Performance
Technology

Prosperity home

What Do You Think About Selling?

There is nothing more important in the selling process than what the seller thinks about selling. Lets face it, most people have very low opinions of salespeople. And most people hate the idea of selling, whether they are doing the selling or being sold to. But when you stop to think about it for a second, selling is the counterpart of buying. And we are all always buying something. We simply cannot exist without buying. As a matter of fact, we love buying. So if we are doing all this buying, and we all hate salespeople, from whom are we buying?

It is all in the thinking. Take cars as an example. Everyone dearly loves their friendly neighborhood car salesman — Yeah, right! Yet over a normal lifetime most of us will buy from them several times. Chances are that if you have ever had a car that you loved, that gave you lots of enjoyment and mile upon mile of trouble-free driving—then you probably always thought of it as "The best car I ever bought." And if you ever had a car that gave you nothing but trouble, the one that put your AAA membership in jeopardy because the tow truck was at your house more than it was at the mechanics—then you probably thought of it as "a lemon that rotten salesman SOLD me."

We Love Buying and Hate Selling

That's the way our thinking usually goes. We take credit for buying the things we like. And we blame the sales people for having sold us the things we don't like. It's no wonder we have such a low opinion about salespeople.

This is why you see so many of the current " income opportunities" advertising that you don't have to do any selling. But since the success of the business depends on someone buying something from you—either the products you have or the idea of earning money the same way you are—then it seems as though you may have to do some selling after all. The sooner you embrace that reality the sooner you will begin to enjoy the benefits of selling.

What are the benefits of selling?

Money is the obvious answer. After all it has been known for a long time that no one earns more money than a good salesperson. But then, what can you do with money? When was the last time you barbecued up some money for a backyard feast? When was the last time you buttoned up in a few hundred dollar bills to go out on a wintry day? Do you crawl into a pile of money for a well-deserved rest after a long day making money? Can you leap into a bundle of $20's to drive to the mall to spend your money?

Money is the obvious answer, but like most of the obvious answers it is the wrong one. The right answer is, "The benefits of selling are just about anything you can think of." Whatever it is that you want, that you need, that makes you happy and comfortable are the benefits of selling.

Now try to wrap your thinking around this idea: To whatever extent you have the things you want, the things you need, the things that make you happy and comfortable, you got them by selling. Whether or not you consider yourself to be a salesperson, you got those things by selling.

You sold your boss on the idea that you could do the job you were hired to do. You have to sell other people on the idea of cooperating with you in order to get your work done. You sell your spouse on the idea of...well, whatever.

Anytime we get someone to cooperate, or to change to our way of thinking, or to trade goods or services with us, or to continue our employment for another pay period, we have sold them on the benefits--to them--of doing that.

When I think about selling I think about buying.

What I mean is that I think about how I like to buy, then I pattern my selling activities so they match the way I like to buy. I hate it when anyone puts any kind of pressure on me to buy something. I don't care how good it is, or how much I might need it or want it, I hate being pressured to buy. There is a 99% certainty that I will not buy from someone who is pressuring me. The only thing that keeps it from being 100% certain is that in the final 1% I just can't get that particular merchandise from anyone else. But any time I can, I will not buy from the pressure salesperson and will go somewhere else to get it.

And, I absolutely cannot put pressure on someone else to buy from me. I have had a long and successful career in selling and in teaching salespeople and I cannot and will not use or teach pressure tactics. I think about how I like to buy, and I give my customers the same consideration that I want for myself

Then why do people buy from me? Because I give them good reasons to buy--then I let them make up their own minds. I do that because I know that people like the things they buy, and they dislike the things they got sold.

What is worse, in most cases, is that they hate the person who sold it to them. When people dislike something or someone that much they are going to tell others. Statistics show that people will usually tell three others about something that they like. But they will tell SEVEN others about something they don't like.

Try to think better about selling. Selling is what makes the world go round. Selling can give you a lifestyle above and beyond your wildest dreams. But it can only do that if you do it right. And it can't do it if you are afraid of it.